Kinds of Personal Injury Cases

Personal injury law dictates that when someone’s actions or negligence causes another person harm, the injured person may be entitled to compensation. The key word here is “may”. There are certainly many instances in which, despite the injury that occurred, there is no one who is legally at fault. Personal injury can be a broken bone or a fatality. Since these cases are often more serious than a typical auto accident, an experienced attorney will be needed to handle the case. Especially if the plaintiff is making a case for a large compensation. Let’s take a look at the specifics of a personal injury.

What Constitutes A Personal Injury?

Personal injury is a fairly broad term. It can be a result of various incidents, from airplane accidents to professional slander. Perhaps the single most common causes of personal injury are auto accidents. This includes 18-wheelers, tractors, motorcycles, and pedestrians. The reason these are the most common is that vehicles are generally much more dangerous and are a direct result of another driver’s actions and omission from important driving rules.

Negligence is another cause of personal injury. Most of the cases of negligence occur in a professional workplace, medical practice, or a public or government property. Medical malpractice is when a doctor, hospital, or medical professional’s carelessness or negligence results in a patient’s injury. Also, according to The Animal Control Act a pet owner may also be charged with negligence if their domestic animal attacks another person.

Other common causes of personal injuries are:

  • Assault
  • Defective products
  • Exposure to asbestos and toxic chemicals
  • Dangerous prescription drugs
  • Nursing home neglect
  • Boating accidents
  • Food poisoning
  • Premise Liability (dangerous conditions on another person’s property)
  • Slip and fall cases
  • Wrongful death (as a result of negligence)

Examples of Personal Injury

Injuries from the incidents can be quite broad and are generally referred to as ‘pain and suffering.’ Depending on the situation, personal injury can result in physical and/or mental pain, including:

  • Concussions or brain damage
  • Broken bones
  • Abrasions
  • Muscle strain
  • Whiplash
  • Paralysis
  • Burns
  • Humiliation
  • Shock
  • Anxiety
  • PTSD

Intentional Personal Injury Cases

Intentional personal injury cases are taken extremely seriously and if the defendant is found guilty, they will most likely face serious criminal charges. There are intentional personal injury cases which have resulted in physical injuries, such as battery and assault. Then there is emotional and professional injuries, such as ‘slander.’ Slander, although not often a physical attack, falls under personal injury as defamation of character.

As is the case with most lawsuits, the extent of the injury (how much pain and suffering occurred) and the last repercussions (such as lost wages) will affect how much compensation will be awarded to the plaintiff. The compensation typically covers payment for medical bills, lost income or property, emotional trauma, and, of course, the generalized ‘pain and suffering.’

Lawsuits can cost an arm and a leg, so knowing what situations in which you can file a personal injury case or have it filed against you will save you a lot of time, effort, and money. Hiring the wrong attorney can leave you worse off than before. Luckily, with The Law Office of D. Chadwick Calvert, you’ll be represented by experienced professionals and won’t have to pay a dime unless we’ve won the case.

Intentional personal injury cases are taken extremely seriously and if the defendant is found guilty, they will most likely face serious criminal charges. There are intentional personal injury cases which have resulted in physical injuries, such as battery and assault. Then there is emotional and professional injuries, such as ‘slander.’ Slander, although not often a physical attack, falls under personal injury as defamation of character.